Life and Travel in Puebla, Mexico

Monthly Archives: October 2013

We just celebrated Halloween at my school today, but it’s also Day of the Dead! Technically the dates are Oct. 28th, 31st, Nov. 1st and 2nd. So get your calavera (candy skull), your hojaldra (sweet bread with a “skull and bones” on top), and a candle and some cempasúchil (marigolds, which guide the spirits), and you’re ready. If you want to go all out, head to Huaquechula in Puebla state to see how it’s done.

A field of cempasúchil, and Cholula's pyramid and church in the background.

A field of cempasúchil, and Cholula’s pyramid and church in the background.

My coworker passed these out to her students.

My coworker passed these out to her students.

A miniature chocolate skull!

A miniature chocolate skull!


It’s supposed to be like a smaller version of the London Eye, but for just $35 pesos, it’s a lot cheaper!

The line was long, but quick.

The line was long, but quick.

It was raining, so unfortunately we couldn't see much.

It was raining, so unfortunately we couldn’t see much.

The fountains outside change colors and rhythms.

The fountains outside change colors and rhythms.


Just another day for ole Popocatépetl.

Just another day for ole Popocatépetl.


Go to Iztaccíhuatl-Popocatépetl National Park. You can see the two mountains everyday from afar, but they’re even more beautiful up close. Izta has lots of camping spots, hiking trails, and pristine waterfalls, while Popo can only be observed, not hiked (due to the fact that he’s quite an active volcano). There used to be a little hotel up there, but you can’t go that far up anymore without special permission from the Army. And anyway, when you see some of the smoky plumes and ash clouds that Popo spits out, you probably won’t want to get much closer!

Popo spewing ash, as seen from Puebla at sunset.

Popo spewing ash, as seen from Puebla at sunset.

Popo in the fall, as seen from Paso de Cortés (inside the park).

Popo in the fall, as seen from Paso de Cortés (inside the park).

One of the many streams behind some popular cabins within the park.

A waterfall behind some popular cabins within the park.

Izta trail

Heading up Iztaccíhuatl.

 

 


On Facebook, the Mexican sushi chain Sushi Itto is home to a new campaign: “Mexicanize a Japanese person.” I understand that cultural differences can be funny and awe-inspiring, and people seem to really be enjoying this publicity stunt.

From the Sushi Itto Facebook page.

The Japanese contestants completed “challenges” like eating spicy salsa in order to garner votes and a ticket to Mexico, while the participants here gave suggestions for “mexicanizing” each Japanese competitor, in order to win their own ticket to Japan.

Now that the chain has chosen a Japanese winner, Miyigawa, everyone is invited to meet him at one of their branches or, failing that, saythat they are his friends in order to get a discount.

From the Facebook page: “Sólo di “soy amigo de Miyigawa” en estas unidades y horarios, ¡y obtendrán un descuento en tu consumo! Los primeros 5 en llegar y mencionar “soy amigo de Miyigawa”, obtendrán 25% de descuento; los siguientes obtendrán 10%. ¿Qué tal? ¡Los esperamos!”

Personally, I think that this campaign is promoting stereotyping of other cultures (as seen in the challenges– Japanese people can’t pronounce Spanish, Japanese people can’t eat spicy food…etc) and using Miyigawa to promote their business. I mean, now you can even get a discount on your food just by saying, most likely falsely, that you’re his friend?

What do you guys think? Fun campaign, or has Sushi Itto crossed a line?

 


Find a town in the Sierra Norte and go spend a day there. The most famous is Cuetzalan, with its cobbled streets, wet fog, and icy waterfalls, but you can find the same in Xochitlán, just with the added bonus of sunset mountain views. Or go to Zacatlán to eat apples, tlacoyos, and salsa chiltepin. On the way there, you can stop by Chignahuapan to visit the lake, buy some blown-glass Christmas ornaments, and get into the stinky sulfur hot springs. Wherever you choose, you’re sure to encounter gorgeous natural landmarks and have an incredible experience!

I told you there was fog in Cuetzalan.

I told you there was fog in Cuetzalan.

rose Chignahuapan

The view from a church outside Chignahuapan.

Heading back to Puebla from Chignahuapan.

Heading back to Puebla from Chignahuapan.

At the Quetzalapa waterfall between Zacatlán and Chignahuapan.

At the Quetzalapa waterfall between Zacatlán and Chignahuapan.


Cholula: Two small towns (San Pedro and San Andrés Cholula), two town squares, 365 churches (according to legend), 1 enormous pyramid, and endless bars and clubs. Spend the day walking or biking around the relatively quiet streets, climb the pyramid and check out the view from the top, explore the dark, cool tunnels that traverse the pyramid from within, then get fancy and go out for drinks and dancing.

The church on top of the pyramid.

The church on top of the pyramid.

A festive day at the church on top of the pyramid.

A festive day at the church on top of the pyramid.

On the San Pedro side of Cholula.

On the San Pedro side of Cholula.
When clubbing, vendors will try to sell you deals on alcohol, balloons, and roses!

When clubbing, vendors will try to sell you deals on alcohol, balloons, and roses!